Cat Adoption Team

Sherwood Shelter Hours
Tues-Fri 12 - 7 pm
Sat-Sun 12 - 6 pm
Closed Monday
Directions »

Lost a cat

Don’t panic. There are steps you can take right away to help you find your missing cat. Start right now and we’ll help you as much as we possibly can. CAT does not typically take in stray or lost cats within Washington and Multnomah counties — contact your local county shelter if you lost a cat in either of those areas.

Take Action to Find Your Cat

  • Ask family, friends, and neighbors to help search for your pet as soon as you realize your pet is missing. Be sure to check around your yard and under your deck.
  • For a lost indoor-only or timid cat, think like a cat and look at every hiding spot possible in your yard and your close neighbors’ yards. Lost cats will remain hidden and quiet. And, perhaps, are inside the house.
  • Dial into the power of your social network. Post information on your Facebook, Twitter, Google+, etc. pages to let your friend know.
  • Check this website for information on lost cat behavior, search tips, tools you can use, and ways you can find your cat. This site offers practical information that has proven effective for finding lost cats all over the world..
  • Visit your local county shelter or the Oregon Humane Society’s cattery to see if your cat was brought there. Those are the first places a stray will go. Bring a color photograph and description of your lost cat in case the shelter accepts lost pet flyers.
  • Check the “found pet” ads posted on Craig’s List, Petfinder.com, and your local paper.
  • Place a “lost pet” ad in your local paper. Oftentimes, newspapers offer these free of charge.
  • Walk, bike, drive, or jog through your neighborhood every day and more than once to find your missing pet.
  • Place clothing, toys, litter box, and other items familiar to your pet outside in your yard where she/he might sense it.
  • Put signs around the neighborhood or area where your pet was last seen. Include a photo and description of your pet, your phone number, and when your pet disappeared. Make sure you have voice mail to answer those calls. Tip: leave out one identifying feature in your pet’s description, such as a splotch of color on the nose or extra toes. This protects you from pet-recovery scams and is a sure-proof way of verifying that someone definitely found your beloved pet.
  • If permitted, post your flyers at these businesses in your area (remember to take them down when your cat is found): gas stations, restaurants/fast food places/taverns, convenience and grocery stores (add an extra poster in their pet food aisles), veterinary clinics/pet groomers/pet supply stores, emergency veterinary clinics, laundromats, churches, and community centers
  • In your fliers and ads, offer a reward, if possible.
  • Check with road crews - since they work outside all day, they may see a missing pet as well
  • Remember, when your cat is found, make sure he/she starts wearing visible identification and talk to your veterinarian about a microchip.

Check out these online resources for more information.

These resources are to assist pet owners and animal caregivers. The contents of external websites are beyond CAT’s control. CAT accepts listings to these web pages complementary to its mission statement and reserves the right to refuse or remove any listings that are not in line with CAT’s mission.

Other organizations

CAT partners with many animal shelters and organization to maximize the lives saved in the Pacific Northwest. Below are links and contact information for many of the local animal organizations in the area.

These resources are to assist cat owners. The contents of external websites are beyond CAT’s control. CAT accepts listings to this web page that are complementary to its mission statement and reserves the right to refuse or remove any listings that are not in line with CAT’s mission.

Pet sitters

It is important to plan ahead when you will be away from home for any length of time. There are several options available to pet owners to ensure their companion animals will be well taken care of in the owner’s absence - in-home pet sitting, leaving your pet with a friend or professional pet sitter at their house, or a professional boarding facility. Read these things to look for in a boarding facility.

Since cats in particular are creatures of habit and don’t necessarily appreciate change, in-home pet sitting will most likely be the preferred choice.

Learn what to ask and how to find the best pet sitter for your cat:

Pet Sitters International
National Association of Professional Pet Sitters

Local pet sitting businesses:

Beaverton Cat Sitting
(503) 626-2019
The purr-fect solution when you can’t be there - serving Beaverton, Raleigh Hills, West Slope, and Garden Home.

Cat-illac Pet Services
Tigard (503) 598-9715 or (503) 330-4290
Loving in-home care for your pets. Sherwood, Tualatin, Beaverton, Tigard, Metzger, Durham, King City and Summersfield, OR.

The Catnap Inn - Feline Bed and Breakfast
(503) 682-6700
Providing premium care for your cat; located in Wilsonville, OR.

Cats in the City
Sellwood (503) 764-2322
Luxurious boarding, cat sitting, grooming.

Cozy Critters Pet Sitters
(503) 650-6449
Pet sitters offering full-service sitting, pet taxi, and more. 10 percent off CAT supporters. Serving West Linn, Lake Oswego, and Portland. (Run by a former CAT staff member.)

Highland Hills Pet Sitting
(503) 484-4540
Offering a multitude of services for a variety of pets. Insured and bonded, American Red Cross Pet First Aid certified, and member of NAPPS.

The Kitty Sitter
Beaverton (503) 590-6002.
In-home cat boarding features no cages, lots of TLC, and private room.

Kristina Weis cat sitter
(360) 931-6506 or (971) 266-3CAT(3228)
A real cat person to take are of your kitties (Portland/Beaverton).

Meowhaus
Portland (503) 281-0222
Overnight hotel and day spa catering exclusively to cats.

Pets First - Diane’s Priority Pet Care
(503) 635-7387
Dogs, cats, small mammals, and birds. Special attention to the physical and emotional needs of your pet. Bonded, insured, licensed, and registered.

Portland Mutt Strut, LLC
(503) 335-9889
Cat sitting and professional dog walking and animal care serving animal lovers from Portland Metro, Beaverton, Vancouver. Everything from daily visits to longer-term vacation care. Fully licensed, bonded, and insured.

Portland Pet Sitters
Portland Pet Sitters is a group of independent professional pet sitters dedicated to providing pet care with the highest standards in the industry. Oregon and SW Washington.

Sellwood Pet Sitting
(503) 231-7257
Bonded and insured; service area is inner SE Portland, Sellwood, Westmoreland, and Eastmoreland.

Tricia’s Loving Care
(503) 567-9690
Pet and home care services including pet sitting, dog walking, and housesitting. SW Portland area, including Tigard, King City, Tualatin, Sherwood, Lake Oswego, Sherwood,  Beaverton and Hillsboro.

Trixie Pet Care
(503) 349-8616
Compassionate pet care for your peace of mind. Licensed, bonded and insured. Serving West Linn and Lake Oswego, as well as surrounding areas.

Wendy Works
(503) 245-2647
Providing loving care for kitties in the comfort of their own home through visits and overnight care. Licensed, insured, and references available.

When You’re Not There Pet Care
(503) 970-3086
Reliable pet sitting serving Tigard, Tualatin, Lake Oswego and Beaverton.

Whisker Watch
(503) 659-8467
Providing loving care for your kitties in the comfort of their own home since 1993. Licensed, insured, and bonded.


These resources are to assist cat owners. The contents of external websites are beyond CAT’s control. CAT accepts listings to this web page that are complementary to its mission statement and reserves the right to refuse or remove any listings that are not in line with CAT’s mission.

Renting with pets

Finding a home for you and your pet(s) can be challenging, so we’ve compiled a few ideas to make it easier to look for pet-friendly housing for you and your furry friend(s).

Be a good pet-owning renter

  • Give yourself enough time to find the right pet-friendly rental (see list below)
  • Offer to pay a higher security deposit and reassure the landlord that your pet has not been destructive in the past, or if s/he has, explain how you handled it
  • Show that you are a responsible pet owner: provide a letter of reference from your current landlord or a letter from your veterinarian
  • Get it in writing that your landlord agreed to allow you to keep a pet in your new apartment
  • Do not try to sneak your pet into your new apartment; this could result in breaking your rental agreement and losing the apartment or being forced to give up your pet(s)

Click here for some great tips to help you convince your landlord you and your cat will be great tenants.

Resources to find pet-friendly housing

apartmentguide.com
apartmentlist.com
donotrent.com (rental reviews written by tenants)
homeproperties.com
hotpads.com
livelovely.com
myapartmentmap.com
mycheapapartments.com
peoplewithpets.com
portlandpooch.com
rentbits.com
rent.com
rent.net
zumper.com

These resources are to assist cat owners. The contents of external websites are beyond CAT’s control. CAT accepts listings to this web page that are complementary to its mission statement and reserves the right to refuse or remove any listings that are not in line with CAT’s mission.

Disaster preparation


Be prepared and keep your pets safe in an emergency:
Preparing for a Disaster: details on how to make an emergency kit and plan
Keeping pets safe when a tornado strikes
Avoid evacuation gridlock with your pet

You may be thinking, I live in Oregon. We don’t have those devastating natural disasters I read about.

Historical natural disasters in the Pacific Northwest

  • Earthquakes - Oregon sits on an active fault
  • Flooding - Johnson Creek regularly floods; Vernonia was underwater in Dec. 2007
  • Hurricanes - In Dec. 2007, hurricane-force winds hit the Oregon coast
  • Snowstorms - 15+ inches fell during a Dec. 2008 snowstorm
  • Tornadoes - Dec. 2010 twister damaged Aumsville; an EF1 touched down in Vancouver in Jan. 2008

 

Paying for vet care

Cats are often considered “low maintenance” pets, but they still need regular veterinary care to stay healthy. The following programs and resources may help you provide and afford necessary emergency or routine vet care.

Find a veterinarian
Find a veterinarian in Oregon
Find a veterinarian in Washington

Emergency funding options
The following programs offer funding to qualified clients for an animal in need of emergency care only. Funding may not always be available and is made at the discretion of the individual organization. Please read through the qualifications for funding carefully before applying.
Hand to Paw Fund
Animal Aid Fund for Urgent Veterinary Care
Velvet Assistance Fund at DoveLewis Emergency Animal Hospital
RedRover Relief Grants
Banfield Charitable Trust HOPE Funds - animal must be a patient at Banfield Pet Hospital
Feline Veterinary Emergency Assistance

Paying for routine veterinary care
CareCredit offers payment options to qualified clients
Tips and resources from the Humane Society of the United States
Pet insurance as an option
Pet insurance reviews
Things to consider when comparing pet insurance (provided by UK blogger)

Low-cost vaccine clinics
Luv My Pet
Good Neighbor Vet

Low-cost spay/neuter
Spay/neuter options


These resources are to assist cat owners. The contents of external websites are beyond CAT’s control. CAT accepts listings to this web page that are complementary to its mission statement and reserves the right to refuse or remove any listings that are not in line with CAT’s mission.

Cat care tips

The resources below will help you navigate the basics of owning and raising your happy and healthy cat. Please use this information to supplement advice from your veterinarian. If you notice any change in your cat’s behavior, consult with your veterinarian first to exclude a physical ailment as the reason for the behavior change.

Cat care essentials »
Cat behavior training »
Cats & kids »
Deter cat from climbing a tree »
Grooming »
Health & nutrition »
Holiday/seasonal tips »
Help for allergies to cats »
Introductions »
Microchips & ID tags »
Moving, renting & traveling with cats »
Outdoor enclosures (catios) & fencing »
Rescue cat from a tree »

If you have any questions, please call us at (503) 925-8903 or send us an .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

These resources are to assist pet owners and animal caregivers. The contents of external websites are beyond CAT’s control. CAT accepts listings to these web pages complementary to its mission statement and reserves the right to refuse or remove any listings that are not in line with CAT’s mission.

 

Cat care

Cats are mysterious creatures, and just like people they have individual quirks, needs, and likes/dislikes. CAT provides basic cat care information to help you better understand feline behavior and provide the best possible care for your cat. Please use this information to supplement advice from your veterinarian or a cat behaviorist. If you notice any change in your cat’s behavior, always consult with your veterinarian first to rule out a physical ailment as the reason for the change.

Use the navigation menu in the lefthand side of this page, or click the links below for information about:

Cat care tips
Paying for vet care
Disaster preparation

For information about resolving common behavior issues, see our behavior correction resources. If you have any questions, please call us at (503) 925-8903 or send us an email.

The resources listed within this section are available to assist pet owners and animal caregivers. The contents of external websites are beyond CAT’s control. CAT accepts listings to these web pages complementary to its mission statement and reserves the right to refuse or remove any listings that are not in line with CAT’s mission.