Cat Adoption Team

Sherwood Shelter Hours
Tues-Fri 12 - 7 pm
Sat-Sun 12 - 6 pm
Closed Monday
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Re-homing advice

Finding a new home for your cat

Here are some tips to re-homing your cat without going through a shelter:

  • Word of mouth. Ask friends and relatives if they know anyone interested in adopting a cat or if they are looking for a kitty themselves.
  • Social media. Post information and photos on your social media pages to let your friends know about your cat; encourage them to share your post with others.
  • Great marketing. Create a compelling flyer with photos of your cat. Show and describe your cat’s great personality traits, as well as any challenges he/she may have. Post this flyer on trusted community boards and at pet supply stores or veterinary offices.
  • Use advertising. Place an ad for your cat through a local newspaper, on pet-friendly message boards, and on other online pet adoption forums and pet classified sites. Be smart when you place your ad: request a vet reference, charge a small re-homing fee, and meet potential adopters in person.
  • Ask for an adoption fee.. Asking a fee will not deter goo families from inquiring about your cat, and it may stop unscrupulous individuals from responding to your ad. Don’t be shy about asking question when you meet potential adopters. You want to make sure your cat goes to a great home. Ask about children, other pets in the home, whether they have ever had a cat before, are they prepared for your cat’s medical needs. Consider your cat’s best interests—you may ask potential adopters if they will allow you to visit their home prior to placing your cat with them. You should also require a valid form of ID and record the driver’s license number for your records.
  • See your vet. Make your cat desirable to adopters by getting a current cat health exam. Other vet care that can help your cat find a new home includes spay/neuter, getting your cat current on vaccinations, have your cat tested for FeLV and FIV; groom your cat and trim your cat’s nails; only adopt out kittens once they are full weaned and at least 10 weeks old. A cat who is already spayed/neutered and vaccinated has a greater chance to find a new home!

Surrendering to a shelter

It’s important to note that many municipal and county shelters are only able to assist with lost and found animals. Many animal organizations, including CAT, may have a waiting list or appointment-only process for bringing cats into the shelter and cannot accept walk-ins.

Do not abandon your cat at any shelter or veterinary clinic. Animal abandonment is a misdemeanor offense in Oregon. Shelters can fine and prosecute those who leave animals at their doorstep.

 

Lost a cat

In all cases of stray or missing pets, the first place to check is your local county animal services agency. When you visit or contact those agencies, provide a color photo and description of your lost cat. Visit their websites and/or shelters regularly to check for your cat. You can also check online lost/found classified listings.

In the Portland metro area, county animal agencies include:
Multnomah County Animal Services »
Washington County Animal Services »
Clark County Animal Services »
SW Washington Humane Society (Vancouver, Wash. area) »

CAT is only able to accept owner-relinquished animals, per county regulations. Clackamas County currently does not accept stray/found cats.

Other tips to find a lost cat

  • Ask family, friends, and neighbors to help search for your pet as soon as you realize your pet is missing. Be sure to check around your yard and under your deck.

  • Walk through your neighborhood every day and more than once to look for your missing pet.

  • For a lost indoor-only or timid cat, think like a cat and look at every hiding spot possible in your yard and your close neighbors’ yards. Lost cats will remain hidden and quiet—check under bushes, in garages and tool sheds, under porches, and any other tucked away place.

  • Post information on your social media pages to let your friends know that you are looking for your lost cat.

  • If your pet is microchipped, contact the microchip company to make sure your contact information is current. You also can put a “lost or stolen” alert on the pet’s microchip so that if it is scanned by a shelter or veterinarian, they will know that a concerned owner is looking for that pet.

  • Check the “found pet” ads posted on Craigslist, Petfinder.com, and your local paper.

  • Place a “lost pet” ad in online lost/found forums and in your local paper.

  • Place clothing, toys, litter box, and other items familiar to your pet outside in your yard where she/he might sense it.

  • Put signs around the area where your pet was last seen. Include a photo and description of your pet, your phone number, and when your pet disappeared. Offer a reward if possible.

  • Ask to post your flyers at businesses in your area such as gas stations, restaurants/fast food places, convenience and grocery stores, veterinary clinics, pet salons, pet supply stores, emergency veterinary clinics, laundromats, churches, and community centers.

  • If funds allow, you may wish to invest in a professional Lost Cat Pet Detective.

Get more information about lost cat behavior, search tips, tools you can use, and ways you can find your cat at Missing Pet Partnership or Petfinder.

The contents of external websites are beyond CAT’s control. CAT accepts listings to these web pages complementary to its mission statement and reserves the right to refuse or remove any listings that are not in line with CAT’s mission.

Other organizations

CAT partners with many animal shelters and organization to maximize the lives saved in the Pacific Northwest. Below are links and contact information for many of the local animal organizations in the area.

These resources are to assist cat owners. The contents of external websites are beyond CAT’s control. CAT accepts listings to this web page that are complementary to its mission statement and reserves the right to refuse or remove any listings that are not in line with CAT’s mission.

Pet sitters

It is important to plan ahead when you will be away from home for any length of time. There are several options available to pet owners to ensure their companion animals will be well taken care of in the owner’s absence - in-home pet sitting, leaving your pet with a friend or professional pet sitter at their house, or a professional boarding facility. Read these things to look for in a boarding facility.

Since cats in particular are creatures of habit and don’t necessarily appreciate change, in-home pet sitting will most likely be the preferred choice.

Learn what to ask and how to find the best pet sitter for your cat:

Pet Sitters International
National Association of Professional Pet Sitters

Local pet sitting businesses:

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
(503) 701-0523
High-quality, in-house pet sitting and feeding - serving the Portland area.

Beaverton Cat Sitting
(503) 626-2019
The purr-fect solution when you can’t be there - serving Beaverton, Raleigh Hills, West Slope, and Garden Home.

Cat Care B & B
(503) 968-6000 ext. 2
Feline-only boarding facility provides loving care and close monitoring in a healthy, safe environment. Oral medication administration, insulin injections, fluid treatments, and other special needs services available. Lake Oswego location.

Cat-illac Pet Services
Tigard (503) 598-9715 or (503) 330-4290
Loving in-home care for your pets. Sherwood, Tualatin, Beaverton, Tigard, Metzger, Durham, King City and Summersfield, OR.

The Catnap Inn - Feline Bed and Breakfast
(503) 682-6700
Providing premium care for your cat; located in Wilsonville, OR.

Cats in the City
Sellwood (503) 764-2322
Luxurious boarding, cat sitting, grooming.

Cozy Critters Pet Sitters
(503) 650-6449
Pet sitters offering full-service sitting, pet taxi, and more. 10 percent off for CAT supporters. Serving West Linn, Lake Oswego, and Portland.

Highland Hills Pet Sitting
(503) 484-4540
Offering a multitude of services for a variety of pets. Insured and bonded, American Red Cross Pet First Aid certified, and member of NAPPS.

In Home Pet Care, LLC
(503) 280-0625
Personalized, compassionate care for your pets in the comfort of your own home. Licensed, bonded and insured.

The Kitty Sitter
Beaverton (503) 590-6002.
In-home cat boarding features no cages, lots of TLC, and private room.

Kristina Weis cat sitter
(360) 931-6506 or (971) 266-3CAT(3228)
A real cat person to take care of your kitties (Portland/Beaverton).

Meowhaus
Portland (503) 281-0222
Overnight hotel and day spa catering exclusively to cats.

Pampurred Pet Care
(360) 635-3816
Caring for your cats in the comfort of their own home. Serving Battle Ground and environgs.

Pets First - Diane’s Priority Pet Care
(503) 635-7387
Dogs, cats, small mammals, and birds. Special attention to the physical and emotional needs of your pet. Bonded, insured, licensed, and registered.

Portland Mutt Strut, LLC
(503) 335-9889
Cat sitting and professional dog walking and animal care serving animal lovers from Portland Metro, Beaverton, Vancouver. Everything from daily visits to longer-term vacation care. Fully licensed, bonded, and insured.

Portland Pet Sitters
Portland Pet Sitters is a group of independent professional pet sitters dedicated to providing pet care with the highest standards in the industry. Oregon and SW Washington.

Sellwood Pet Sitting
(503) 231-7257
Bonded and insured; service area is inner SE Portland, Sellwood, Westmoreland, and Eastmoreland.

Tricia’s Loving Care
(503) 567-9690
Pet and home care services including pet sitting, dog walking, and housesitting. SW Portland area, including Tigard, King City, Tualatin, Sherwood, Lake Oswego, Sherwood,  Beaverton and Hillsboro.

Trixie Pet Care
(503) 349-8616
Compassionate pet care for your peace of mind. Licensed, bonded and insured. Serving West Linn and Lake Oswego, as well as surrounding areas.

Wendy Works
(503) 245-2647
Providing loving care for kitties in the comfort of their own home through visits and overnight care. Licensed, insured, and references available.

When You’re Not There Pet Care
(503) 970-3086
Reliable pet sitting serving Tigard, Tualatin, Lake Oswego and Beaverton.

Whisker Watch
(503) 659-8467
Providing loving care for your kitties in the comfort of their own home since 1993. Licensed, insured, and bonded.


These resources are to assist cat owners. The contents of external websites are beyond CAT’s control. CAT accepts listings to this web page that are complementary to its mission statement and reserves the right to refuse or remove any listings that are not in line with CAT’s mission.

Renting with pets

Finding a home for you and your pet(s) can be challenging, so we’ve compiled a few ideas to make it easier to look for pet-friendly housing for you and your furry friend(s).

Be a good pet-owning renter

  • Give yourself enough time to find the right pet-friendly rental (see list below)
  • Offer to pay a higher security deposit and reassure the landlord by offering a formal pet resume
  • Show that you are a responsible pet owner: provide a letter of reference from your current landlord or a letter from your veterinarian
  • Get it in writing that your landlord agreed to allow you to keep a pet in your new apartment
  • Do not try to sneak your pet into your new apartment; this could result in breaking your rental agreement and losing the apartment or being forced to give up your pet(s)

Click here for some great tips to help you convince your landlord you and your cat will be great tenants.

Resources to find pet-friendly housing

The following websites allow you to refine your apartment search to show listings that are pet-friendly.

apartmentguide.com
apartmentlist.com
hotpads.com
livelovely.com
myapartmentmap.com
peoplewithpets.com
rentbits.com
rent.com
rent.net
trulia.com
yourhomesuite.com
zillow.com
zumper.com

These resources are to assist cat owners. The contents of external websites are beyond CAT’s control. CAT accepts listings to this web page that are complementary to its mission statement and reserves the right to refuse or remove any listings that are not in line with CAT’s mission.

Disaster preparation


Be prepared and keep your pets safe in an emergency:
Preparing for a Disaster: details on how to make an emergency kit and plan
Keeping pets safe when a tornado strikes
Avoid evacuation gridlock with your pet

You may be thinking, I live in Oregon. We don’t have those devastating natural disasters I read about.

Historical natural disasters in the Pacific Northwest

  • Earthquakes - Oregon sits on an active fault
  • Flooding - Johnson Creek regularly floods; Vernonia was underwater in Dec. 2007
  • Hurricanes - In Dec. 2007, hurricane-force winds hit the Oregon coast
  • Snowstorms - 15+ inches fell during a Dec. 2008 snowstorm
  • Tornadoes - Dec. 2010 twister damaged Aumsville; an EF1 touched down in Vancouver in Jan. 2008

 

Paying for vet care

Cats are often considered “low maintenance” pets, but they still need regular veterinary care to stay healthy. The following programs and resources may help you provide and afford necessary emergency or routine vet care.

Find a veterinarian
Find a veterinarian in Oregon
Find a veterinarian in Washington

Emergency funding options
The following programs offer funding to qualified clients for an animal in need of emergency care only. Funding may not always be available and is made at the discretion of the individual organization. Please read through the qualifications for funding carefully before applying.
Hand to Paw Fund
Animal Aid Fund for Urgent Veterinary Care
Velvet Assistance Fund at DoveLewis Emergency Animal Hospital
RedRover Relief Grants
Banfield Charitable Trust HOPE Funds - animal must be a patient at Banfield Pet Hospital
Feline Veterinary Emergency Assistance

Paying for routine veterinary care
CareCredit offers payment options to qualified clients
Tips and resources from the Humane Society of the United States
Pet insurance as an option
Pet insurance reviews
Things to consider when comparing pet insurance (provided by UK blogger)

Low-cost vaccine clinics
Luv My Pet
Good Neighbor Vet

Low-cost spay/neuter
Spay/neuter options


These resources are to assist cat owners. The contents of external websites are beyond CAT’s control. CAT accepts listings to this web page that are complementary to its mission statement and reserves the right to refuse or remove any listings that are not in line with CAT’s mission.

Cat care tips

The resources below will help you navigate the basics of owning and raising your happy and healthy cat. Please use this information to supplement advice from your veterinarian. If you notice any change in your cat’s behavior, consult with your veterinarian first to exclude a physical ailment as the reason for the behavior change.

Cat care essentials »
Cat behavior training »
Cats & kids »
Deter cat from climbing a tree »
Grooming »
Health & nutrition »
Holiday/seasonal tips »
Help for allergies to cats »
Introductions »
Microchips & ID tags »
Moving, renting & traveling with cats »
Outdoor enclosures (catios) & fencing »
Rescue cat from a tree »

If you have any questions, please call us at (503) 925-8903 or send us an .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

These resources are to assist pet owners and animal caregivers. The contents of external websites are beyond CAT’s control. CAT accepts listings to these web pages complementary to its mission statement and reserves the right to refuse or remove any listings that are not in line with CAT’s mission.